Sound Recording Room – Sound Absoption

It’s been nearly a year since I built my sound recording room / foley room in the garage. Now that I’ve launched the new web site, the USFX 1.3 update, and 4 sound design packs, I finally found time to edit some video footage I shot during the room build process to compare the effectiveness of different steps in treating the room to absorb sounds and make it as close to a dead room as I could.

There is a short version of the video which just contains the hand clap comparison for each step.

If you want more detail of what, how, and why – check out the full video below. I hope you find it useful if you are considering building a sound recording or foley room. If you are just here for curiosity of what goes into recording dry sounds I hope you find it interesting. Give me a shout if you have any questions =)

Want to find out more? I also posted “making of” blog posts for the build of the room:
Making of the Sound Recording Room Part 1
Making of the Sound Recording Room Part 2
Making of the Sound Recording Room Part 3

Video: Pitch Shifting and Microphone Specs

The other day I broke a laptop monitor in half and I recorded it using four very different microphones with different specifications. I recorded the sounds with a sampling rate of 192 kHz and loaded the sounds into Izotope RX5 to show the spectrogram and pitch down the sounds two octaves. This video demonstrates how different the sounds are when pitched down since some of the microphones capture audio well beyond what the human ear can hear – yet when you pitch the sound down those inaudible frequencies are brought into our range of hearing:

Microphones Used:
Sanken CO-100K (20 – 100’000 Hz)
Sennheiser MKH 8040 (30 – 50’000 Hz)
Rode NTG3 (40 – 20’000 Hz)
Schoeps CCM41 (40 – 20’000 Hz)

Recorder:
Sound Devices 788T

Software Used:
Izotope RX5

Making of the Sound Recording Room Part #3

It took me another month to complete the room, but I am pleased to say that now it’s finally ready!

Sound Room

I’ll break down the steps that followed from my last “making of” post. Basically, the room was structurally ready with all the walls, ceiling, and door so it was sound proofing and final touches that remained. I also spent went to the US for a 10-day trip with some friends which ate away some of my time… and funds…

Pre-insulationAt this stage, the sound is like an echo chamber. A rectangular room with flat plaster board surfaces and a hard floor. I also bought 10W LED-lights (750 lumen each) that I put up into the corners and I put some simple electrical wiring up. I ended up opting for normal extension leads because I want to be able to take the lights down and relocate them in the room if necessary. The reason I went for LED-lights are primarily because they are silent (no humming) and they don’t generate much heat which benefits both the room temperature and also it won’t heat up the metal of the light which in traditional lights have a tendency to start producing clicking sounds as the metal contracts/expands.

Continue reading “Making of the Sound Recording Room Part #3”

Making of the Sound Recording Room Part #2

Over a month has passed since I started to build the sound recording room so it’s time for another update. I have been able to spend about 6-7 full working days since the last update and the room is coming along nicely.


Back in late Feburary I put up the first few plaster boards on the two walls that would be closest to the outer walls of the garage. I had to start by only putting those plaster boards up since I needed exterior access and I if I were to put all boards up it would be difficult to move the already heavy construction close to the exterior walls. There are two layers of plaster boards, the first ones were mounted vertically and the second layer horizontally to minimize sound leaking through the cracks.

Continue reading “Making of the Sound Recording Room Part #2”

Making of the Sound Recording Room Part #1

Finally, after months and months of clearing out the garage (it is incredible how much junk accumulates over 10 years), I have started to build the sound absorbing recording room. The sound room will finally enable me to record source material with as little reverb as possible and I’ve been putting off a lot of recording until I could finish this room.

Sound Curtain
Sound Curtain

I’m making the room as a capsule in my garage with 120x45mm studs and joists. I will put double layer of plaster boards on the outsides and then fill the gaps with 120mm sound-absorbing insulation.

Continue reading “Making of the Sound Recording Room Part #1”